Quick Answer: Why Are The Principles Of The Treaty Of Waitangi So Important?

How does the Treaty of Waitangi affect us today?

The Treaty now means there must be respect between Māori and non-Māori.

It is important that the laws and rules today consider and respect both Māori and non-Māori ways of living.

It is important that Māori and non-Māori who live near each other are considerate of each other and respect each other’s differences..

What were the effects of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The Government made laws which stopped them from living on and taking care of their land in the ways that they always had done. The Government stopped Taranaki hapu from controlling their lives. It destroyed their communities.

What happened after the Treaty of Waitangi?

What happened after the Treaty was signed? Shortly after the Treaty was signed, Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson proclaimed British sovereignty over the whole of New Zealand. … Under British law, New Zealand became technically a part of the colony of New South Wales.

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi important in education?

The Treaty of Waitangi principle calls for schools to understand and honour Treaty principles in all actions and decision making. It is about making our country’s bicultural foundations evident in school policies, organisation, physical spaces, whānau and community engagement, and classroom planning and assessment.

Who was against the Treaty of Waitangi?

Tāraia NgākutiTāraia Ngākuti, a chief of Ngāti Tamaterā in the Coromandel, was one of many notable chiefs who refused to sign the Treaty of Waitangi.

Why does the Treaty of Waitangi matter?

Why the Treaty is important The Treaty governs the relationship between Māori – the tangata whenua (indigenous people) – and everyone else, and ensures the rights of both Māori and Pakeha (non-Māori) are protected. … requiring the Government to act reasonably and in good faith towards Māori.

What does the treaty principle of protection involve?

The principle of protection is about actively protecting Māori knowledge, interests, values, and other taonga. Identity, language, and culture are important expressions of what it means to be a culturally located learner.

What are the main principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.

Why were the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi developed?

Treaty principles developed by the Crown iwi have the right to organise as iwi, and, under the law, to control their resources as their own. all New Zealanders are equal before the law. both the government and iwi are obliged to accord each other reasonable cooperation on major issues of common concern.

Why is the concept of the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi problematic?

Why is the concept of ‘the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi’ problematic? It is problematic because it is not clear who defines the principles. The government had both versions of the treaty and then looked for common ground. … The Prendergast ruling dominated treaty jurisprudence for 70 years.

What the Treaty of Waitangi says?

In the English version, Māori cede the sovereignty of New Zealand to Britain; Māori give the Crown an exclusive right to buy lands they wish to sell, and, in return, are guaranteed full rights of ownership of their lands, forests, fisheries and other possessions; and Māori are given the rights and privileges of British …

What did the Treaty of Waitangi promise?

The Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840 and was an agreement between the British Crown and a large number of Māori chiefs. … The Treaty promised to protect Māori culture and to enable Māori to continue to live in New Zealand as Māori.

The Treaty of Waitangi gives an assurance for both nurse and patient that they will work together to preserve and improve better health outcomes. … It also ensures the servicers and delivery of health is done in an appropriate way. Nurses and midwifes must respect and protect Maori beliefs (Nursing Council, 2009).