Quick Answer: Can Viruses Be Activated?

Can viruses be inactive?

Viruses can lay dormant, also referred to as “viral latency” which means a virus has the ability to remain inactive for a period of time within its host.

Since the virus has found a home within its cell, it only needs to be triggered to become active.

The five most common dormant diseases include the following..

What activates a dormant virus?

When HSV replicates in skin cells, it eventually heads toward a sensory nerve. When it reaches the neuron’s nucleus, it does not go through the same lytic infection cycle. Instead of replicating, it does something unusual – the virus goes dormant. This is called a latent infection.

Can viruses grow on their own?

Most biologists say no. Viruses are not made out of cells, they can’t keep themselves in a stable state, they don’t grow, and they can’t make their own energy. Even though they definitely replicate and adapt to their environment, viruses are more like androids than real living organisms.

Why do viruses reactivate?

Viral reactivation is associated with several stress factors [1], including viral infection (with other viruses), nerve trauma, physiologic and physical changes (e.g., fever, menstruation and exposure to sunlight) and immunosuppression (as in cytomegalovirus [CMV] disease).

Do viruses lie dormant in the body?

Virus latency (or viral latency) is the ability of a pathogenic virus to lie dormant (latent) within a cell, denoted as the lysogenic part of the viral life cycle. A latent viral infection is a type of persistent viral infection which is distinguished from a chronic viral infection.