Quick Answer: Are Smokers At Higher Risk Of Contracting The Coronavirus Disease?

Are children with underlying health conditions at higher risk for COVID-19?

Current evidence suggests that people with underlying conditions such as chronic respiratory illness including asthma (moderate-to-severe), obesity, diabetes or cancer, are at higher risk of developing severe disease and death than people without other health conditions.

This also appears to be the case for children, but more information is still needed..

Can COVID-19 be transmitted through feces or urine?

SARS-CoV-2 RNA has also been detected in other biological samples, including the urine and feces of some patients. One study found viable SARS-CoV-2 in the urine of one patient. Three studies have cultured SARS-CoV-2 from stool specimens. To date, however, there have been no published reports of transmission of SARS-CoV-2 through feces or urine.

What is the incubation period of the coronavirus disease?

The incubation period of COVID-19, which is the time between exposure to the virus and symptom onset, is on average 5-6 days, but can be as long as 14 days. Thus, quarantine should be in place for 14 days from the last exposure to a confirmed case.

Can waterpipe smoking increase the risk of contracting the coronavirus disease?

Most cafés tend not to clean the waterpipe equipment, including the water jar, after each smoking session because washing and cleaning waterpipe parts is labour intensive and time consuming. These factors increase the potential for the transmission of infectious diseases between users.

Who is most at risk for the coronavirus disease?

People of all ages can be infected by the new coronavirus (2019-nCoV). Older people, and people with pre-existing medical conditions (such as asthma, diabetes, heart disease) appear to be more vulnerable to becoming severely ill with the virus. WHO advises people of all ages to take steps to protect themselves from the virus, for example by following good hand hygiene and good respiratory hygiene.

Is there a correlation between nicotine usage and COVID-19?

There is currently insufficient information to confirm any link between tobacco or nicotine in the prevention or treatment of COVID-19. WHO urges researchers, scientists and the media to be cautious about amplifying unproven claims that tobacco or nicotine could reduce the risk of COVID-19.WHO is constantly evaluating new research, including that which examines the link between tobacco use, nicotine use, and COVID-19.