Question: What The Treaty Of Waitangi Means To Me?

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi important?

Why the Treaty is important The Treaty governs the relationship between Māori – the tangata whenua (indigenous people) – and everyone else, and ensures the rights of both Māori and Pakeha (non-Māori) are protected.

It does that by: …

making the Government responsible for helping to address grievances..

What the treaty means today?

The Treaty was a contract of respect between the British and Māori. … The Treaty now means there must be respect between Māori and non-Māori. It is important that the laws and rules today consider and respect both Māori and non-Māori ways of living.

Why do we need a treaty?

Why is a treaty important? A treaty could provide, among other things: a symbolic recognition of Indigenous sovereignty and prior occupation of this land. … better protection of Indigenous rights.

What food is eaten on Waitangi Day?

Waitangi DayCelebration seafood platter with caper and basil dressing.Thai Mussel Fritters.Beachside paella.

What is HAPU mean?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. In Māori and New Zealand English, a hapū (“subtribe”, or “clan”) functions as “the basic political unit within Māori society”.

What is a treaty and what does it do?

Treaty, a binding formal agreement, contract, or other written instrument that establishes obligations between two or more subjects of international law (primarily states and international organizations).

What is the importance of a treaty in today’s society?

Treaties form the basis of most parts of modern international law. They serve to satisfy a fundamental need of States to regulate by consent issues of common concern, and thus to bring stability into their mutual relations.

What does Waitangi mean?

There are several possible meanings for ‘Waitangi’ – it literally translates as ‘noisy or weeping water. ‘ Reed’s Place Names of New Zealand notes that the literal meaning of the Waitangi in the Bay of Islands may refer to the noise of Haruru Falls at the mouth of the Waitangi River.

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi called the Treaty of Waitangi?

Page 1 – Introduction. The Treaty of Waitangi is New Zealand’s founding document. It takes its name from the place in the Bay of Islands where it was first signed, on 6 February 1840. … Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson had the task of securing British sovereignty over New Zealand.

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi important in education?

The Treaty of Waitangi principle calls for schools to understand and honour Treaty principles in all actions and decision making. It is about making our country’s bicultural foundations evident in school policies, organisation, physical spaces, whānau and community engagement, and classroom planning and assessment.

What does the Treaty of Waitangi represent?

The Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840 and was an agreement between the British Crown and a large number of Māori chiefs. … The Treaty promised to protect Māori culture and to enable Māori to continue to live in New Zealand as Māori.

What are the 4 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

What is Te Tiriti o Waitangi (Treaty of Waitangi)?give protection, rights and benefits to Māori as British subjects.give Māori full ownership of their lands, forestries, fisheries, taonga (treasures) and possessions.give the Crown exclusive rights to buy Māori land.give sovereignty/governance of New Zealand to Britain.

What Waitangi Day means to me?

Waitangi Day means to me, it kind of brings everyone together, Maori and non-Maori, and we get to share our [Maori] culture. … It’s a day that Maori get to celebrate their culture . . . it’s a time we lose our negative names and get to shine on the positive bits of our culture.

What are the 3 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.

What is Waitangi Day and why do we celebrate it?

Waitangi Day (Māori: Te Rā o Waitangi), the national day of New Zealand, marks the anniversary of the initial signing – on 6 February 1840 – of the Treaty of Waitangi, which is regarded as the founding document of the nation.